Slow For Butterfly Migrations

Butterfly on a flower
Butterflies and flowers – a sure sign of spring

I love that there is a time of year when our community is asked to please slow down on their commutes in order to save butterflies.

The California tortoiseshell butterflies (a different species than the one pictured above) are doing their annual migration across Hwy 140 just outside the Yosemite park boundary. In 2010 extraordinary numbers of these beautiful but delicate creatures fluttered their way across the highway and were killed en masse by passing cars.

But it doesn’t have to be a killing field. If cars hold to a 25 mph speed limit, the butterflies get pushed up into the slipstream around the car and are alley-ooped up over the car safely instead of being smashed against the windshield or grill.

Please, if you are planning to come into Yosemite, help save our butterflies. Take a little extra time to drive slowly and enjoy butterfly migration season.

The Yosemite Un-List

Reading by the river.
Reading books next to rushing water. The best!

Part of the beauty of living in Yosemite is feeling like I have time. There is time to take a short walk to nowhere in particular, breathe deep, and (at the risk of sounding too hippy dippy) just be. I can walk a book out to the edge of a river and spend an afternoon reading without wondering if there was something else that I should have crammed in to my 3-day trip. Sounds nice, doesn’t it?

And here’s the thing, there is no way to see everything in Yosemite in 3 days anyway. We moved here in 2003 full time, and there are still so many things that I haven’t seen yet, or want to visit again.

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Dogwood Memories

Dogwoods are peaking near our house in Yosemite West. Picture taken from our deck.

Dogwood trees have a particular niche of its own in the passing of seasons. In the spring, their large white blossoms (actually sepals) decorate the forests and mark the arrival of spring. Photographers of all levels focus their lenses on them – against a backdrop of dark red cedar bark, the deep grey blue of the Merced River or back-lit against the brilliance of the sky. They are stand-alone beautiful, and I love them for that, but I also love them because they’re now associated with people and memories that are fun to revisit as well.

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